Monday, September 17, 2007

Cleveland Clinic Caves on Complaints About Painting

The Cleveland Clinic prides itself on its collection of art. However, a couple of complaints of racial bias got this painting - "My Home Town," by a local, Black artist, Michelangelo Lovelace - yanked. I honestly don't understand what all the fuss is. Is it because the crowd seems to be divided - mostly Blacks on one side and Caucasians on the other?


Anyone born and raised in Cleveland is fully aware that we live in one of the most segregated Metropolis in the US. Though, to our credit, our suburbs have become much more diverse. I thought art was supposed to be about making a commentary on our society. I believe that's what Mr. Lovelace was doing.

Read the story in the Cleveland Plain Dealer here.

4 comments:

Don said...

Yeah, I also do not understand why they are making a fuss about the painting. I liked it. But then again, I am black....

maddypappy1 said...

I didn't see what the problem with the painting was. The guy who painrted it was black, and it's a fairly accurate description of the city. When politicians try not to use racial terms to define a crime or issue plaguing the city, they often use the terms east to identify a problem as one associated with blacks and west for whites. People, this city is segregated. that painting would help open the door to discourse fpr solving the problem. Removing the painting accomplishes nothin

Samara Leigh said...

I agree. It is a wonderful way to open dialogue. Thought-provoking, even controversial art - in the form of poetry, sculpture, paintings, prose, plays, and more - has been an impetus to change for ages.

gretchenaro said...

I have no problem with the painting, in fact, I like it. I just don't see the segregation between east and west anymore. Since moving back to Cleveland nine years ago, I've lived in Cleveland Heights and Old Brooklyn and I see more diverse neighborhoods than when I was a kid. I know a lot of the old prejudices still exist but things are progressing despite them.

The removal of this painting is reactionary and unfortunate. I would love to see Cleveland take a lead nationally in opening up dialogue between its divided communities. But alas, some are stuck in old ways of thinking.